Choral Music Fit for Kings Fills the House at Duane Smith Auditorium Saturday Night

Review by Bonnie Gordon

The King's Singers drew a full house at Duane Smith Auditorium Saturday night. Patrons lined up in the lobby to purchase the ensamble's latest CD. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

The world-famous ensemble, The King’s Singers, enchanted a full house at the Duane Smith Auditorium Saturday night in a concert that was both sophisticated and fun.

The six man ensemble charmed the audience from the start with their engaging “Brit wit” and went on to enthrall them with an evening of incredible choral music.

The special night began with compositions by modern choral composer Bob Chilcott who set to music four poems linked by the themes of time, youth, age and death.

The poetry, by Philip Larkin, James Joyce, E. E. Cummings and Sir Walter Raleigh was rendered even more heartbreakingly beautiful by the silken harmonies of The King’s Singers.

This was followed by lively (and funny) renditions of French folk songs. And so it went.

The King’s Singers moved effortlessly through a repertoire that ranged from modern choral compositions through madrigals, Renaissance compositions, folk songs and Beatles tunes.

Their rich voices make each of the six performers a star.

Executive Director Linda Deck of the Bradbury Science Museum and her husband Ralph Chapman visit with friends prior to the concert at Duane Smith Auditorium Saturday night where nearly 900 people listened to The King's Singers' world class voices. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

The perfectly blended voices and crystal clear enunciation combined with perfect delivery brought The King’s Singers a standing ovation from a delighted audience.

The King’s Singers might be exquisitely refined, but they were never ever stuffy.

Many thanks to the Los Alamos Concert Association for bringing us yet another world-class concert.

Join the Concert Association for the final concert of the season, The St. Lawrence String Quartet, at 4 p.m. Sunday, May 13.

Visit the Los Alamos Concert Association at their website www.losalamosconcert.org.

LANL Director Charlie McMillan, second from left, and his wife Janet McMillan, far right, chat with friends in the lobby of Duane Smith Auditorium while waiting for The King's Singers Concert to begin Saturday night. Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Los Alamos Concert Association Board Member Katy Korkos, left, and Board President Carolyn Mangeng work behind the ticket counter at Duane Smith Auditorium. Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Concert patrons chat before The King's Singers Concert Saturday night at Duane Smith Auditorium. Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Patrons select The King's Singers CDs to take home after Saturday night's enormously successful concert. Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

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Second Strange Being Sighted in Los Alamos!

A Second Strange Being Sighted in Los Alamos  The second weird creature has been sighted in Los Alamos in as many weeks. "It" was sighted lurking around the Los Alamos Little Theater and attempting to enter through a side door. “It” appeared to be a “Lovable Creature” but seemed to find English difficult. It appears to be a carrodactyl flying-carrot-type radiculose from the planet Radicule by the name of Ramseed. People are being to question whether Los Alamos is being invaded. Contact the Los Alamos Daily Post if you observe any unusual creatures roaming through town. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

The second weird creature has been sighted in Los Alamos in as many weeks. "It" was sighted lurking around the Los Alamos Little Theater attempting to enter through a side door. “It” appeared to be a “Lovable Creature” but seemed to find English difficult. "It" appears to be a carrodactyl flying-carrot-type radiculose from the planet Radicule by the name of Ramseed. People are beginning to question whether Los Alamos is being invaded. Contact the Los Alamos Daily Post if you observe any unusual creatures roaming about town. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Beautiful Bowls Available at the March 17 Empty Bowl Event

KRSN 1490 News:

The annual Empty Bowls event draws volunteers from across the community who create colorful bowls for sale to raise money for Self Help, Inc. Courtesy/KRSN

The 18th annual Empty Bowl event is set for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 17 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

For a donation of $10 or more, community members can choose a hand painted bowl and enjoy a delicious soup and bread lunch with live entertainment. 

All of the money raised during the Empty Bowl event goes directly to support the work of Self Help, Inc.

Self Help, Inc. assists Northern New Mexico families in need of immediate emergency aid, and encourages the growth of small businesses with seed money grants.

Purpose and Mission: Self Help, Inc. is committed to enhancing life skills and empowering individuals by providing programs and services that focus on developing self-reliance.

Winner of the prestigious Piñon Award, Self Help, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting those in need in northern New Mexico. Since 1969, Self Help, Inc. has provided consultation and advocacy, emergency financial assistance and seed money grants to residents of Los Alamos, northern Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, and Taos counties.

Each year, through grants and private and public contributions, our organization is able to support those who need help most, during emergencies or in the quest to become economically self-sufficient. Self Help is a member of United Way of Northern New Mexico Serving Los Alamos and Rio Arriba Counties.

Self Help, Inc. is committed to enhancing life skills and empowering individuals by providing programs and services that focus on developing self-reliance.

Winner of the prestigious Piñon Award, Self Help, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting those in need in northern New Mexico. Since 1969, Self Help, Inc. has provided consultation and advocacy, emergency financial assistance and seed money grants to residents of Los Alamos, northern Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, and Taos counties.

Each year, through grants and private and public contributions, our organization is able to support those who need help most, during emergencies or in the quest to become economically self-sufficient. Self Help is a member of United Way of Northern New Mexico Serving Los Alamos and Rio Arriba Counties.

Arts in Public Places to Discuss Art for White Rock Visitor Center

County News:

A meeting of the Arts in Public Places Advisory Board is set for 4:30-6 p.m. Wednesday at Mesa Public Library.

Members will discuss potential art for the White Rock Visitor Center.

Among other items on the agenda is an update of information regarding the re-location of “Strange Trio,” a brief update on the “Call for Artists” for the Animal Shelter and a discussion of the remaining work needed to develop a 5-Year Strategic Plan.

The public is invited to attend the meeting.

The mission of the Arts in Public Places Advisory Board is to encourage the integration of art into the architecture of municipal structures, increase the general public awareness of art, to visually enhance the community, to capture a part of local history for future generations, to promote the establishment of a collection of art, with the works of artists who live or work, or who have lived or worked in Los Alamos County having a high priority.

 

A Sneak Peak @ PEEC’s Upcoming Events

PEEC News:

Planet Jupiter

Planetary Alignment Viewing

March 12, 7:30 p.m. @ PEEC. A rare close conjunction of two very bright planets, Jupiter and Venus, is occuring. Chick Keller and Steve Becker will have telescopes at PEEC to view the planets and discuss what is happening. Public is invited, admission is free.

 

 

Infrared House

YOUR Sustainable Home, Sustainable Los Alamos Series

March 14, 7 p.m. @ PEEC. so you’ve heard from the experts about how to make your home more sustainable. Now we want to hear from you! Join us for a fun, world-cafe style evening of learning and sharing ideas/actions we do to live more sustainably. Bring your favorite tips, tools, and ideas to help us gather fun and easy things we can all do today to create a sustainable future. Come to share your ideas or pick up some great tips from your neighbors! This FREE event is brought to you by PEEC and the Los Alamos Co-op Market. No registration required. Door prizes!

 

 

Jane's Journey

Jane’s Journey, a film at the Reel Deal

March 22, 7 p.m. @ Reel Deal. Almost 25 years ago famed primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall gave up her career in order to devote her entire time and energy to the mission of saving our planet. As this charismatic woman tells us about her life, she is shown among her beloved chimpanzees in Africa, as well as on her travels around the globe to spread her message that there is still hope for future generations. This documentary offers an intimate portrait of the private person behind the world-famous icon, possibly the most fascinating woman of our time, whose scientific breakthroughs are considered to be among the most important of the past 100 years. Purchase tickets at the door. $10 adults, $5 kids.

 

 

 

Starlab

Starlab Planetarium Shows

March 23, 7 p.m. and March 25, 2 pm @ PEEC. Avoid the outdoor cold and view the stars inside a warm planetarium dome. In addition to pointing prominent constellations and stars, Pajarito Astronomers President Steve Becker will demonstrate how the sky looks at the north pole, equator and near the south pole. Get ready for the 2012 Los Alamos Dark Nights by learning major constellations. Recommended for ages 10 and up. Specially priced at $5 for individuals and $15 for families. Register in advance at www.pajaritoeec.org/programs/calendar.php

Coming up (details on PEEC Calendar at www.pajaritoeec.org/programs/calendar.php)

April 1 – 30 Children’s Earth Day Art at Mesa Public Library
April 2 – 30 Earth Day Art show at the Betty Ehart Senior Center
April 10 History and the Ever-Changing Enchanted Land: Then and Now
April 13 & 14 Petra and the Jay – Tickets on sale now
April 18 Wonder of Nature, Rachel Carson
April 21 Earth Day Festival at www.pajaritoeec.org/programs/earthday/earthday2012.php
April 22 Party for PEEC – Tickets on sale now
May 6 Liquid Gold: Hands-on Beekeeping Workshop

 

Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery to Represent Ceramic Artist Marc Hudson

By Mandy Marksteiner

Artist Marc Hudson at work in his studio. Photo by Mandy Marksteiner

When I first visited Hudson’s garage studio he immediately plopped a six-pound lump of clay onto his wheel and leaned into the amorphous blob with his whole body until it took shape. First it became a tall cylinder, and as he coaxed the walls to expand, it became what he called a “rumptious round.”

As Hudson described it, “The clay doesn’t have any opinions about its final destiny. It’s the byproduct of erosion and it doesn’t mind that. When people see clay (or a blank sheet of paper or an empty canvas) they need to create something, to use it to solidify their imagination.”

Hudson is one of six new artists that Karen Wray, owner of Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery, will represent this spring. The other artists include Kimber Wallwork-Heineman (Digital Art), Eric Ringquist (Metal Art), TK Thompson (Photography), Dominique Samyn-Werbrouck (Oil Paintings) and Kathy Veenstra (Oil Paintings).

Like the other upcoming artists at Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery, Hudson has already established his career. In 2000 he was the Artist in Residence at Fuller Lodge Art Center, and he participated in the Espanola Art Festival, and served as its president for three years.

Artist Marc Hudson. Photo by Mandy Marksteiner

His work looked to me like a form of meditation. It turns out that when he began working with clay, that’s exactly what it was. He had just been drafted to the Viet-Nam war. He said, “I needed a relaxing center in clay as an alternative to being in the military.”

Since then, working with clay has been a long creative journey where Marc has developed his sense of style by devising experiments that allow him to get the results that he wants.

For example, he wasn’t getting the results that he wanted using commercial glazes. The list of people available to teach him how glaze materials work was pretty short and he wasn’t getting the answers he needed.

He bought tools – a scale for measuring ingredients, bags of chemicals, books with recipes and chemical analyses of ingredients, and software that describes how ingredients interacted with one another – and experimented.

He wasn’t being a perfectionist; he just wanted glazing to be an adventure. He said, “My usual approach to clay is to exercise considerable control while it is on the wheel or in the extruder, so it is refreshing to let my guard down and let the glaze act and react serendipitously.”

“Wood ash particularly appeals to me as a primary ingredient in glazes because it is a bit of a ‘wild card,’ its effect somewhat unpredictable,” Hudson said. “Ash likes to flow at high temperatures, yet its surface tension tries to make the glaze bead up–like a struggle between control and abandonment.”

He devised a system of organization that allows him to easily look up the recipe for any glaze. Over a thousand glazes on test tiles are coiled on the ceiling of his studio. The tiles are all numbered and grouped by 30 on each string.

“While I enjoyed mixing and testing glazes a great deal, my wife told me that I needed to just get on with making pots!” said Hudson. “But learning about clay and glazes is a journey.”

One of his favorite glazes was made possible by his experiments. He wanted to reproduce a glaze that was featured in Ceramics Monthly, but he didn’t have the right equipment. Through experimentation he was able replicate the final product.

See Marc Hudson’s artwork at Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery, 2101 Trinity Dr., Suite B-2 across from Ashley Pond. Visit www.karenwrayfineart.com or call 660-6382.

Dr. John C. Hopkins to Lecture on ‘The Cold War and U.S. Nuclear Weapons: From My Perspective’

Mushroom-shaped cloud and water column from the underwater Baker nuclear explosion of July 25, 1946. Photo taken from a tower on Bikini Island, 3.5 miles away. Courtesy Photo

Los Alamos Historical Society News:

 

John Hopkins

Dr. John C. Hopkins will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge on “The Cold War and U.S. Nuclear Weapons: From My Perspective” as part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2011-2012 lecture series.

“Nuclear weapons, and hence Los Alamos, played a major role during the Cold War.

Immediately after World War II, the task at Los Alamos was to rebuild the staff following the mass exodus that took place with the surrender of Japan.

Hostility with the Soviet Union, that had origins going back to the Russian Revolution, was exacerbated by Soviet belligerence in Europe following the War.

Consequently the United States looked to nuclear weapons to counter the vast land army of the Soviet Union.

The world changed in August 1949 when the Soviet Union had their first nuclear test.

The 1950s witnessed enormous changes in nuclear weapons and the rationale for their use.

These were the golden years for Los Alamos when the lab enjoyed strong support in Washington.

Numerous technical advances were made from the development of very small weapons to the very largest hydrogen bombs.

The 1960s saw an evolution in nuclear weapons policy and, toward the end of the decade, the beginning of a long downward trend in the numbers of weapons in the stockpile.

The 1970s and ‘80s saw the development of the most sophisticated weapons with reduced weight, size and use of nuclear materials.

Finally the Cold War came to an end in the 1990s and Los Alamos started a new chapter in a long and distinguished history.”

Hopkins is a nuclear physicist with a 1960 Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Seattle and a Fellow of the American Physical Society with over 40 publications.

He retired in December 1993, after 34 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory researching nuclear physics, performing and leading nuclear weapons testing, and then as leader of the entire nuclear weapons program at Los Alamos.

He was leader of the Center for National Security Studies at Los Alamos and a technical advisor to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in Washington and in Geneva.

Hopkins has worked closely with the State, Energy, and Defense Departments and has participated in numerous special programs for the U.S. Government.

This year, the Centennial Lecture Series celebrates 100 years of Los Alamos History and New Mexico Statehood. Lectures are the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Lectures. The lectures are free and open to the public, because of the generosity of Los Alamos National Bank and the donations of members of the Historical Society.

FSN Offering Programs for Teens, Tweens and Parents with Workshops that take out the ‘Squirm Factor’

Youth Volunteer Natalie Smith spends time helping a local child get creative during a Gingerbread House Building event at the Family Strength's Network. Courtesy/FSN

Family Strengths Network News:

Adolescence is a critical developmental time for every family.

While young people are learning to use their emerging independence to discover their strengths, parents look for opportunities to balance their child’s need for freedom with guidance and direction.

Proactive families know that while children don’t come with a handbook, there are local resources to facilitate a positive experience for everyone during this period of growth.

Family Strengths Network (FSN) is providing a record number of programs for tweens, teens, and their parents this spring.

For families who are ready to meet this transition with education, a good sense of humor, and pizza, FSN offers Tweens to Teens for Girls March 13 and Tweens to Teens for Boys March 20.

Dr. Tom Csanadi and LAPS teacher Scott Johnson lead discussion and activities with boys aged 11 – 14 and their fathers or other male adult.

Public Health Nurse Megan Pfeffer and educator Jennifer Bartram address the changes puberty brings with girls ages 9 – 13 and their mothers or other female adult.

These workshops help take the “squirm factor” out of communicating about adolescence.

In Girls Circle, middle school and high school students use discussion and crafts to express themselves and learn to think independently.

This empowering group meets Mondays from March 5 – April 30.

High school girls meet 3:30-5 p.m. at FSN. Eighth grade girls meet during lunch at LAMS.

The program will provide eighth graders with lunch and high school kids with refreshments. The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board is funding the Circle programs.

Reduce, reuse, and save at the Prom Dress Swap, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. March 24 at FSN.

Drop off donations at the Teen Center or FSN for a $5 coupon toward your new dress. The Key Club is co-sponsoring this event.

The Parents of Teens Breakfast Group will meet from 7:30 8:30 a.m. at The Coffee Booth on Tuesday mornings April 17 – May 8.

Early risers can purchase breakfast and get tips on avoiding power struggles and navigating changes in family dynamics.

Jennifer Bartram will use Active Parenting of Teens, a powerful evidence-based tool, to facilitate discussion. The DWI Council is funding this event.

For more information and online registration for these and other programs including Parenting with Love and Logic for families of school age kids and Ages of Discovery for families with newborns through age five, visit www.lafsn.org.

Family Strengths Network, 1990 Diamond Dr., 662-4515, is a private, non-profit organization and a United Way Community Partner.

Diverse Faiths Share Soup and Spirituality

The first Lenten Soup Supper took place last Thursday at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and drew a diverse crowd of local Episcopalians, Lutherans, Jews, Methodists, United Church members and others. Those gathered enjoyed a free meal of homemade soups and breads, were inspired by four different teaching sessions, and ended the event by joining together in a brief evening prayer service. The Lenten Soup Supper events will continue at 6 p.m. every Thursday, including this evening, through March 29. Everyone is welcome to stop by the TOTH Parish Hall at 3900 Trinity Dr., at the corner of Diamond and Trinity, to partake in savory soups, breads sure to warm the cockles of most hearts and a gentle dose of spiritual edification. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com